Linked list

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Programming basics[1]

In computer science, a linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation. is a linear collection of data elements, called nodes, each pointing to the next node by means of a pointer. It is a data structure consisting of a group of nodes which together represent a sequence. Under the simplest form, each node is composed of data and a reference (in other words, a link) to the next node in the sequence. This structure allows for efficient insertion or removal of elements from any position in the sequence during iteration. More complex variants add additional links, allowing efficient insertion or removal from arbitrary element references [2].

DataStructuresLinkedList.png

Students should be able to sketchRepresent by means of a diagram or graph (labelled as appropriate). The sketch should give a general idea of the required shape or relationship, and should include relevant features. diagrams illustrating: adding a data item to linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation., deleting specified data item, modifying the data held in the linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation., searching for a given data item.

Singly linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation.

In computer science, a linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation. is a linear collection of data elements, in which linear order is not given by their physical placement in memory. Instead, each element points to the next. It is a data structure consisting of a group of nodes which together represent a sequence. Under the simplest form, each node is composed of data and a reference (in other words, a link) to the next node in the sequence. This structure allows for efficient insertion or removal of elements from any position in the sequence during iteration. More complex variants add additional links, allowing efficient insertion or removal from arbitrary element references.[3]
Singly-linked-list.png


This video discusses the C programming language, but the content is clear to describeGive a detailed account or picture of a situation, event, pattern or process. linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation..


Doubly linked lists

In computer science, a doubly linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation. is a linked data structure that consists of a set of sequentially linked records called nodes. Each node contains two fields, called links, that are references to the previous and to the next node in the sequence of nodes.[4]
Doubly-linked-list.png


Please reference this article for explanation of a doubly-linked list


This video discusses the C programming language, but the content is clear to describeGive a detailed account or picture of a situation, event, pattern or process. linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation..

Circularly linked listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation.

In the last node of a listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation., the link field often contains a null reference, a special value used to indicate the lack of further nodes. A less common convention is to make it point to the first node of the listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation.; in that case the listGive a sequence of brief answers with no explanation. is said to be 'circular' or 'circularly linked'; otherwise it is said to be 'open' or 'linear'.[5]
Circularly-linked-list.png
Please reference this article of a circularly linked list

Standards

  • DescribeGive a detailed account or picture of a situation, event, pattern or process. how linked lists operate logically.
  • SketchRepresent by means of a diagram or graph (labelled as appropriate). The sketch should give a general idea of the required shape or relationship, and should include relevant features. linked lists (single, double and circular).

External Links

A good site with helpful information about linked lists

an excellent site with an interactive animation about linked lists

References