Ontology and folksonomy

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Web Science[1]

Ontology

In computer science and information science, an ontology is a formal naming and definition of the types, properties, and interrelationships of the entities that really exist in a particular domain of discourse.

An ontology (in information science) compartmentalizes the variables needed for some set of computations and establishes the relationships between them.

The fields of artificial intelligence, the Semantic Web, systems engineering, software engineering, biomedical informatics, library science, enterprise bookmarking, and information architecture all create ontologies to limit complexity and organize information. The ontology can then be applied to problem solving.[2]

Folksnomy

Folksonomy is a system in which users applyUse an idea, equation, principle, theory or law in relation to a given problem or issue. public tags to online items, typically to aid them in re-finding those items. This can give rise to a classification system based on those tags and their frequencies, in contrastGive an account of the differences between two (or more) items or situations, referring to both (all) of them throughout. to a taxonomic classification specified by the owners of the content when it is published. This practice is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, social indexing, and social tagging. Folksonomy was originally "the result of personal free tagging of information [...] for one's own retrieval", but online sharing and interaction expanded it into collaborative forms. Social tagging is the application of tags in an open online environment where the tags of other users are available to others. Collaborative tagging (also known as group tagging) is tagging performed by a group of users. This type of folksonomy is commonly used in cooperative and collaborative projects such as research, content repositories, and social bookmarking.[3]

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Standards

These standards are used from the IB Computer Science Subject Guide[4]

  • DistinguishMake clear the differences between two or more concepts or items. between an ontology and folksonomy.


References

  1. http://www.flaticon.com/
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ontology_(information_science)
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folksonomy
  4. IB Diploma Programme Computer science guide (first examinations 2014). Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom: International Baccalaureate Organization. January 2012.